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Old 2017-04-05, 01:00
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Darkflame Darkflame is offline
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Using this thread for another random ramble.

Was just thinking of "big" films recently and thought Id note down my thoughts.

Best Action Film: Captain America:Civil War

Actually,Might be my best action film in a few years.
(unless I am forgetting something).
Best "mainstream huge budget" film as well...maybe.

I have been thinking why I liked the film so much and I think the main reasons have nothing to do with whats in the film - its all based on whats not in it.

Dont get me wrong. Its got a solid story. Juggles a lot of characters well given most at least some sort of arc.
Its also built around a conflict between good people *that isnt based on a stupid missunderstanding*.

Normally in tv/film when good people fight eachother, its because they simply know different things and cant be arsed to talk before throwing punchs. With this film the characters know everything, they are all open and honest - yet still dissagree profoundly.

But thats not the main reason why this is a good big-budget action film. No.
You see most action films these days bore me.
And I dont just mean the normal "well most of everything sucks" "most".
No, I mean they have been getting more and more boring over the last few decades.

Action films tend to be based on spectacle. aka Trying to show me something awesome. If you got a action hero, give me a crazy stunt. If you got a setpiece, make it unique. iconic. special.
But inevitably these days the spectacle is one or both of;

A)Explosions
The last time a explosion interested me was V for Vendetta.
Doesnt mater how big they make them. Or how many angles they show it from. Explosions just arnt interesting any more.

B)Destruction
Arnt we all fed up with buildings and city's being destroyed yet? Lots of films, especially recently, seem to think the longer and bigger their destruction sequences are the more interesting it is. err..not really no.

So both of those things are a utter waste of time for me.


But Civil War wastes basically zero time on them. Hell, its a film _about_ explosions and destruction more then it is a film with explosions and destruction. Its basically saying "hay, maybe the Avengers being Team Amercia:World Police" isnt such a good idea. Its not being condescending about other films - but it is making a point: Hay, theres people in those buildings.

The film does, of course, still have other action movie elements - over the top fight scenes and car chases.
Car chases dont bore me as much as explosions and destruction - they can be entertaining still and it was short in this film anyway.
Fight scenes meanwhile depends if they are creative and with good choreography. Show me something new, or clever. Occasionally we still get that.

Superhero movies especially have zero excuses when it comes to these things. They arnt being "realistic", so they should be able to show us new spectacles more easily.
Show us something not seen before, _or get on with the actual plot_. And for the most part Civil War did that.
(Doctor Strange did as well for that mater - but the plot itself wasn't nearly as interesting.)

Worth pointing out writers of CW also did the previous film, which was also surprisingly good. The conflict wasn't as good, but it still had a more interesting story then the normal "Big Bad Villain Needs Punching" to fight. Marvel isnt stupid, so have got the same writers to do their next super-big-budget-crossover-epic thing too.

However, I strongly suspect that the next film they make will be no where near as good as this ....as it seems (sigh) its exactly just a "Big Bad Villain Needs Punching" story rather then anything more complex.
Hopefully I am wrong.
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