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Old 2003-07-20, 06:04
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Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.
Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.
Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.
Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.
Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.
The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.
Crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials are all referred to as crocodilians. Crocodiles are survivors of a time known as the Age of Reptiles, a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth, dating from 265 million years ago to roughly 66 million years ago.

We raise Suffolk sheep, currently. The females are ewes and they tend to weigh less than the males, called rams. Primarily the ewes are the only sheep kept on our farm all year long, as most of the lambs are sold at an auction. Males who are not castrated and turned into wethers are often too smelly to keep and other establishments are better equiped to handle them.
Most of the 4-H members who use our Farm want to raise sheep as market animals. In our area, the Suffolk and Hampshire breeds usually place best at the Fair because of their growth rate and muscling. We have had mostly Suffolks, but some Shropshire, Shropshire/Suffolk crosses, Dorsets, Dorset/Suffolk crosses, Southdowns, Oxfords, Rambouillets, and a Hampshire cross at the Farm. Each of these breeds or crossbreeds has a purpose, but we have had the most success with the Suffolks. Some sheep breeds are better raised for meat; others for wool. Suffolk fleece is not a good quality wool, but the meat is the best!
All crocodilians have powerful jaws. Their sharp teeth are designed for grasping and tearing, with small prey swallowed whole, while larger prey is torn apart and the pieces swallowed. The teeth are periodically replaced with up to 50 sets of teeth by the time the crocodilian is old. Baby crocodilians feed heavily on insects and small fish. Crocodilians swallow stones to aid in digestion of food. Crocodilians' digestive system is powerful enough to dissolve bones of their prey. When food is plentiful, they store fat in their tails and body. The fat enables them to go long periods without eating.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.

Southerners weren't the first people in the world to fry their chickens. Almost every country has a version of fried chicken, or fricassee, from Vietnam's Gà Xaò to Italy's pollo fritto. It is thought that the Scottish people who settled the early South introduced the method here in the United States. They preferred frying their chickens, rather than baking or boiling them as the English did. It wasn't until the early 1900s that recipes for fried chicken began appearing in popular "northern" cookbooks. Fannie Farmer's 1896 cookbook only refers to "Fried Chicken" as a fricassee served with "Brown Sauce" or as oven-baked "Maryland Chicken".

Mary Randolph, in the third printing of Virginia House-Wife (1828), told how to make fried chicken. Very simply, the chickens are cut up, dredged in flour, sprinkled with a little salt, put in a skillet with hot fat, and fried until golden brown. Through the years there have been hundreds of attempts to improve upon her recipe, and plenty of tricks and special touches, but they are all simply minor variations on the original. Mary Randolph mentions making a gravy with the "leavings", but the cream sauce so often served with fried chicken seems to have originated with the dish "Maryland fried chicken". In the cookbook, Fifty Years in a Maryland Kitchen (Baltimore, 1873), the only fried chicken recipe calls for a sauce made of butter, cream, parsley, salt and pepper.

The recipe in The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery recommends browning before covering, then frying slowly and turning frequently. Camille Glenn, in The Heritage of Southern Cooking states that chicken is not dipped in milk, crumbs, or batter, simply flour, while the recipe in Bill Neal's Southern Cooking requires a soaking in buttermilk. James Villas, in American Taste, soaks his chicken pieces overnight in milk and lemon juice, and cooks them in vegetable shortening with the addition of 4 tablespoons of bacon grease. The few things everyone seems to agree on are that the skillet must be a well-seasoned black iron one (preferably deep and with a cover), the chicken must be young and lean, and that fried chicken is to be eaten with the fingers.
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